Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Think of All the Businesses That Did NOT Happen, Thanks to Government Bureaucrats and Regulations


President Obama:

"There are a lot of wealthy, successful Americans who agree with me -- because they want to give something back.  They know they didn’t -- look, if you’ve been successful, you didn’t get there on your own.  I’m always struck by people who think, well, it must be because I was just so smart.  There are a lot of smart people out there.  It must be because I worked harder than everybody else.  Let me tell you something -- there are a whole bunch of hardworking people out there.  (Applause.)

If you were successful, somebody along the line gave you some help.  There was a great teacher somewhere in your life.  Somebody helped to create this unbelievable American system that we have that allowed you to thrive.  Somebody invested in roads and bridges.  If you’ve got a business -- you didn’t build that.  Somebody else made that happen."

Or in the case of 13-year old entrepreneur Nathan Duszynski in Holland, Michigan, who tried to start a business, and somebody else (government bureaucrats) made that not happen.  Here's what happened, or more accurately, what didn't happen, according to the Holland Sentinel:

"Nathan Duszynski (pictured above), 13, decided he wanted a hot dog cart, so he could earn some money. But as he was setting up shop Tuesday in the parking lot of Reliable Sports at River Avenue and 11th Street — across the street from Holland City Hall — a city of Holland zoning official shut him down. Now, after spending more than $2,500 to start up his business, Duszynski is throwing in the towel, his mom said."

34 Comments:

At 7/18/2012 12:13 AM, Blogger Cabodog said...

My nine year old launched a lemonade stand and was *almost* shut down by the local health inspector, who demanded that my son 1) have a food server permit ($10 to take the test) and 2) acquire a restaurant license and pay the annual $300 fee. There was also an "ice scooping" permit at $50.

Luckily, my son had chosen to set up his stand at a local art fair; people began to gather and became vocal, stating "this just isn't right" as the inspector, clipboard in hand, worked on closing my son's lemonade business.

I also stood up to the inspector and flatly told him that there was no way my son was closing his business; that the inspector needed to cite him and that we would be happy to take the matter to court.

The inspector did the wise thing; he backed down, turned on his heel and walked away.

My son got a great lesson and ended up $172 wealthier that day, with 25% of that donated to charity.

And, guess what, no one got sick from his product.

 
At 7/18/2012 12:38 AM, Blogger Benjamin said...

Local and state regulations are anti-competitive---try push-cart vending in any city in the United States. This would allow a guy with limited capital to ply his own craft or store. Forget it.

Conservatives never seem to care about this. Or liberals.

And opening up a bar is usually prohibitive also.

 
At 7/18/2012 2:21 AM, Blogger PeakTrader said...

June Small Business Optimism Lowest Since October 2011
July 10, 2012

“All in all, this month’s survey was a real economic downer,” said NFIB Chief Economist William Dunkelberg. “The economy has definitely slowed; job growth will be far short of that needed to reduce the unemployment rate unless lots of unemployed leave the labor force—no consolation. Taxes remain a top concern for the small-business community. With the Supreme Court’s endorsement of the individual mandate as a tax in its health care decision, we will have to wait for July’s survey to realize the effect it will have on small business confidence.

With over 20 new taxes contained in the law—a price-tag of $800 billion—and most of the regulations yet to be written by HHS, the implications for employee costs remain unclear. Uncertainty reigns supreme for much of Main Street.”

Nearly one-quarter of owners cite weak sales as their most important business problem (23 percent), followed by taxes (21 percent) and unreasonable regulations and red tape (19 percent).

 
At 7/18/2012 5:46 AM, Blogger Ed R said...

A story with some appeal to be sure -- hard-hearted bureaucrats shut down an aspiring young entrepreneur.

Most cities have zoning laws for reasons their own citizens and elected reps decide. Should Holland let Nathan continue his business in an area from which all other potential competitors are barred?

 
At 7/18/2012 6:31 AM, Blogger Jon Murphy said...

Most cities have zoning laws for reasons their own citizens and elected reps decide.

That's the problem, isn't it? The minority deciding for the majority. Also, I don't know the laws where you live, but I have never heard of a popular election on zoning rules. It may be different where you are, I don't know.

 
At 7/18/2012 7:37 AM, Blogger Zachriel said...

Ed R: Most cities have zoning laws for reasons their own citizens and elected reps decide.

Yeah. Can't imagine why county health departments would regulate the distribution of food.

 
At 7/18/2012 7:41 AM, Blogger Zachriel said...

Jon Murphy: Also, I don't know the laws where you live, but I have never heard of a popular election on zoning rules.

The typical procedure is popular election of a mayor and council. Rules are proposed, followed by open hearings. A council vote is taken on the proposed rule. Then, new, periodic elections.

 
At 7/18/2012 8:01 AM, Blogger Ken said...

Can't imagine why county health departments would regulate the distribution of food.

For kickbacks and bribes. And for the simple pleasure of lording authority over people. Why else?

 
At 7/18/2012 8:43 AM, Blogger morganovich said...

zach-

"
Yeah. Can't imagine why county health departments would regulate the distribution of food."

and i can't imagine why you would think that it any of your or the government's business where and what i eat.

you see to be assuming your premise here.

if i want to buy a hot dog from a kid with a cart and he wants to sell it to me, what business is it of the state's?

this is just another exercise in taking away liberty to benefit a select few incumbents and to feed a bureaucracy.

if you want to eat only as restaurants that have a rating from a health inspector, that's fine. you are free to do as you like. but when you begin to demand that everyone else do the same, perhaps against their will, then you are taking away the liberty of others.

 
At 7/18/2012 9:06 AM, Blogger Paul said...

"Think of All the Businesses That Did NOT Happen, Thanks to Government Bureaucrats and Regulations"

They didn't not build that.

 
At 7/18/2012 9:09 AM, Blogger Paul said...

Morganovich,

"and i can't imagine why you would think that it any of your or the government's business where and what i eat."

Because once Obamacare transitions to single-payer, you're going to be on the government's books as a liability. Not a good thing to be when we're already $16 trillion in debt.

 
At 7/18/2012 9:19 AM, Blogger Jon Murphy said...

The typical procedure is popular election of a mayor and council. Rules are proposed, followed by open hearings. A council vote is taken on the proposed rule. Then, new, periodic elections.

True, but it's still a city council vote, not a popular election. The minority deciding for the majority.

 
At 7/18/2012 9:20 AM, Blogger Buddy R Pacifico said...

Zachriel states:

"Ed R: Most cities have zoning laws for reasons their own citizens and elected reps decide.

Yeah. Can't imagine why county health departments would regulate the distribution of food."


Zachriel and Ed R,

Did either of you read the article that Prof. Perry linked to?

From the article:

"The cart cost $1,800, some repairs were needed and with the cost of food and the $208 temporary food vendor permit, the family is out some money “that we really didn’t have,” Johnson said."

Nathan's food cart had a food vendor permit and was on private property in a parking lot.

I do agree with Zachriel that people need to get involved in local council issues and elections.

 
At 7/18/2012 9:21 AM, Blogger Nicolas Martin said...

See relevant article:


Government regulation: Lemonade Day done wrong
http://tinyurl.com/3nqlhay

 
At 7/18/2012 9:41 AM, Blogger Jet Beagle said...

Buddy Pacifico: "I do agree with Zachriel that people need to get involved in local council issues and elections."

I think the degree of involvement varies with the size of the city or town. I've witnessed and participated in vicious fights in my suburban town of Flower Mound. Local elections almost always involve zoning and tax issues.

Unfortunately, our courts have allowed the majority to trample all over the property rights of the minority. Zoning laws are the most effective means the majority has for doing so, IMO.

 
At 7/18/2012 9:51 AM, Blogger Che is dead said...

"The Department of Labor is poised to put the finishing touches on a rule that would apply child-labor laws to children working on family farms, prohibiting them from performing a list of jobs on their own families’ land.

Under the rules, children under 18 could no longer work “in the storing, marketing and transporting of farm product raw materials.”

“Prohibited places of employment,” a Department press release read, “would include country grain elevators, grain bins, silos, feed lots, stockyards, livestock exchanges and livestock auctions.”

The new regulations, first proposed August 31 by Labor Secretary Hilda Solis, would also revoke the government’s approval of safety training and certification taught by independent groups like 4-H and FFA, replacing them instead with a 90-hour federal government training course. ..." -- The Daily Caller


Instilling in the young the values and work ethic necessary for their future success must be thwarted in order to insure that we are not providing fodder for profit seeking capitalists. Apply for food stamps - it's the patriotic thing to do.

 
At 7/18/2012 11:08 AM, Blogger Sam Grove said...

A small percentage (<1% even) of a population complaining about a problem is enough to have city councils pass legislation that affects the entire population without any feedback from the general public.

 
At 7/18/2012 11:45 AM, Blogger morganovich said...

sam-

which makes them different from state and federal government how?

such practice is common at all levels of government.

 
At 7/18/2012 12:14 PM, Blogger Itchy said...

Hello! This is a synthetic tube of processes animal parts that gets boiled in water. If you eat too many of these you are going to get chronic diarrhea regardless of what the health department says.

He had a permit to operate the cart anyway, and as stated previously, he was on private property. It sees that the city council just doesn't want dirty immigrant children serving food in the public view.

If the store owner would only pay the appropriate fees to build a permanent hotdog stand inside the store...

 
At 7/18/2012 1:45 PM, Blogger jorod said...

The restaurants probably complained. He should move to New York or New Jersey.

 
At 7/18/2012 2:12 PM, Blogger Jet Beagle said...

sam grove,

My experience with local city government is different from yours. Our town council in Flower Mound tries to get input from as many citizens as possible. Our suburban newspaper helps out by informing voters about proposed changes before the council votes on them.

 
At 7/18/2012 2:44 PM, Blogger Jennifer said...

We asked for these regulations. We asked that restaurants be guaranteed clean and safe and inspected regularly so we wouldn't get sick. We asked for this level of oversight. We asked for zoning laws because we didn't want "gentlemen's clubs" next to our elementary schools or our houses, for that matter. We ask for these rules and then when the laws are applied to us we get our panties in a twist.

If you are against the law, work to change it. Bitching about it on the internet isn't going to fix anything. But then, everyone loves to complain as it's much easier to do that than actually engage in changing things.

 
At 7/18/2012 2:57 PM, Blogger Jon Murphy said...

But that's the thing, Jennifer: he had the permits. He had all the necessary paper work, the OK from the city council and the mayor, and the permit from the county to operate where he was. This is a case of an overzealous city official.

 
At 7/18/2012 2:59 PM, Blogger juandos said...

"True, but it's still a city council vote, not a popular election. The minority deciding for the majority"...

What's that old saying? "elections have consequences"...

 
At 7/18/2012 4:47 PM, Blogger Ken said...

Jennifer,

We asked for these regulations.

"We" didn't ask for any of these things, you arrogant bitch. As noted above, local politics and laws are determined by a vanishingly small percentage of the population. Zoning ordinances and food regulations pretty much demonstrates what democracy does NOT look like. To say "we", as if you speak for a group, much less a majority, much less most people, reveals your ingrained ignorance or apathy or both. In other words, it reveals what a callous unthinking person you are.

Also, if you think government keeps restaurants clean and safe, you're a grade A tool. What possible profit could there be in making patrons sick? How long would a restaurant stay in business that sickened its customers?

If you are against the law, work to change it. Bitching about it on the internet isn't going to fix anything.

You mean the way you're bitching on the internet?

Also, are you unaware of the networking capabilities of, you know, NETWORKS? The internet provides a cheap way for like minded people to communicate with one another and to provide news about the various idiots (like you and the regulators in this post).

 
At 7/18/2012 6:04 PM, Blogger Free2Choose said...

"We" didn't ask for any of these things, you arrogant bitch"

"Like"

 
At 7/18/2012 6:36 PM, Blogger Ron H. said...

Wow Ken, nice work. While even I might have been a tiny bit gentler, you got the job done, and there's nothing I can add.

 
At 7/18/2012 7:57 PM, Blogger juandos said...

"Instilling in the young the values and work ethic necessary for their future success must be thwarted in order to insure that we are not providing fodder for profit seeking capitalists"...

That's right che and if the little brats are working hard and getting a realistic view of the world then they won't have time to spend at the summer madrassas where they'll get lunches that are 'free'...

 
At 7/18/2012 9:14 PM, Blogger Hydra said...

a city of Holland zoning official shut him down. Now, after spending more than $2,500 to start up his business, Duszynski is throwing in the towel, his mom said."

===================================

Sounds like he did not do his homework.

 
At 7/18/2012 9:21 PM, Blogger juandos said...

"Sounds like he did not do his homework"...

Sounds like the citizens of Holland were guilty of voting stupid...

 
At 7/19/2012 5:43 AM, Blogger Zachriel said...

This comment has been removed by the author.

 
At 7/19/2012 5:44 AM, Blogger Zachriel said...

Ken: "We" didn't ask for any of these things, you arrogant bitch.

Being rude won't strengthen your argument.

Ken: As noted above, local politics and laws are determined by a vanishingly small percentage of the population.

Representatives elected by popular vote. How did you think representative democracy worked?

Hydra: Sounds like he did not do his homework.

He can fix the problem for $208, or ≈8% over his expected budget. He probably doesn't want to move his cart.

 
At 7/19/2012 7:35 AM, Blogger Jon Murphy said...

Representatives elected by popular vote.

But their policies are not.

 
At 7/19/2012 7:36 AM, Blogger Jon Murphy said...

Sounds like he did not do his homework.

He did, though. Had permission from the mayor, city council, and all the necessary permits from the county. Check it out, it's in the article.

 

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