Wednesday, March 07, 2012

Commercial Natural Gas Falls to 9-Year Low in Dec.

The price of commercial natural gas fell to $8.28 per 1,000 cubic feet in December, according to data recently released by the EIA.  Adjusted for inflation, that's the lowest price since September 2002, more than nine years ago, see chart above. 

9 Comments:

At 3/07/2012 12:54 PM, Blogger Buddy R Pacifico said...

Natural gas price trends are incredible for U.S. consumers.

So, what about price trends for Russian natural gas?

Here is a ten yer price chart for Russsian gas at the German border.

Then, you might ask about Indonesian Liquified Natural Gas(LNG), or not, but it's still interesting. Take a look at the
120 month price chart for LNG in Japan.

In a couple of years, U.S. and Canadian nat gas will be liquified and shipped to Asia, and possibly Western Europe, in massive quantities.

 
At 3/07/2012 1:44 PM, Blogger Jon Murphy said...

In a couple of years, U.S. and Canadian nat gas will be liquified and shipped to Asia, and possibly Western Europe, in massive quantities.

And the problem is?

 
At 3/07/2012 2:03 PM, Blogger rjs said...

time for a govt subsidy:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/06/democrats-natural-gas-subsidies-senate-transportation-bill_n_1324367.html

 
At 3/07/2012 2:16 PM, Blogger Ron H. said...

rjs: "time for a govt subsidy:"

[link}

T. Boone Pickens working productively with Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is something to be feared more than terrorists or global warming.

 
At 3/07/2012 2:42 PM, Blogger Buddy R Pacifico said...

"And the problem is?"

Problem?

I was pointing out opportunity Jon, and I am surprised you might would construe differently.

 
At 3/07/2012 3:05 PM, Blogger Jon Murphy said...

I was pointing out opportunity Jon, and I am surprised you might would construe differently.

My mistake! I was agreeing with you! I was just suggesting that people will find a problem with that. I really should have been more clear! Man, communicating is hard when one cannot see the other!

 
At 3/07/2012 3:19 PM, Blogger Buddy R Pacifico said...

Jon, I understand now, and I too, often have communication problems in e-mails and comments. You are right that people will have a problem with nat gas exports. I don't hear complaints about huge wheat and soybean exports.

 
At 3/07/2012 4:19 PM, Blogger juandos said...

On Youtube: Gas Prices Explained

 
At 3/07/2012 5:38 PM, Blogger VangelV said...

Natural gas price trends are incredible for U.S. consumers.

The problem is that at current prices shale gas investors are getting killed. With producers going bankrupt how will consumers get their gas?

In a couple of years, U.S. and Canadian nat gas will be liquified and shipped to Asia, and possibly Western Europe, in massive quantities.

No chance of that ever happening. Shale gas production consumes about as much energy as is produced. Liquefy that gas and you lose around 30% of that energy. The last time I checked with real economists as opposed to naive promoters you needed a positive return to make money.

This is one big bubble. Why can't people see the obvious?

 

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home