Monday, March 05, 2012

Interesting Facts: Online Job Demand

From today's Conference Board report on Online Job Demand:

1. In North Dakota, there are more advertised online jobs available (17,000) than unemployed workers (12,540) for a Supply/Demand ratio of less than 1 (0.74).  Nationally, there are 2.91 unemployed workers for each online job available (12.758 million unemployed and 4.383 million advertised openings).  

2. For the occupation "Computer and Mathematical Science," there are five times as many openings (595,000) as unemployed workers (131,600) for a Supply/Demand ratio of 0.20, and the average hourly pay for that occupation is $37.13. See related Bloomberg article on the new surge in technology-industry hiring as demand swells for computer-software applications.

3. For "Healthcare practitioners and technical," there are 2.5 openings (597,000) for every unemployed worker (244,200), for a Supply/Demand ratio of 0.40, and pay averages $34.27 per hour. 

4. There are slightly more openings for "Architecture and engineering" (168,000) than unemployed workers (141,400), for a Supply/Demand ratio of 0.90, with average pay of $36.32 per hour.

Bottom Line: For certain occupations (computer science and health care), and in certain states (North Dakota), there are actually labor shortages.  

9 Comments:

At 3/05/2012 3:53 PM, Blogger Jon Murphy said...

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204880404577230870671588412.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

This is an article by some guy named Mark J. Perry (I've never heard of him, either) about the worker shortage in another industry: manufacturing

 
At 3/05/2012 3:59 PM, Blogger morganovich said...

there are lots of labor shortages, especially in tech. try and find a semiconductor engineer. nurses are also in short supply as are all manner of geology folks.

there is a big disconnect in the US between what our schools are producing and our economy needs. why is a real basket of eels that i'll leave aside, but the fact of it is very pronounced.

we used to get around this with immigration, but currently, we are hamstringing ourselves by preventing it.

forcing china and india's best and brightest to go home after they get US degrees as opposed to keeping them here and benefiting from them is just a terrible idea.

 
At 3/05/2012 4:04 PM, Blogger Jon Murphy said...

we used to get around this with immigration, but currently, we are hamstringing ourselves by preventing it.

forcing china and india's best and brightest to go home after they get US degrees as opposed to keeping them here and benefiting from them is just a terrible idea.


Very good point, Morganovich

 
At 3/05/2012 4:54 PM, Blogger Sean Brodrick said...

Maybe they should try raising salaries on those open positions and they might get them filled.

 
At 3/05/2012 5:28 PM, Blogger Larry G said...

it's pretty ironic that we have a high unemployment ...and at the same time positions crying for qualified applicants.

I'm not even sure these are college graduate positions but rather technical school positions.

high unemployment - unfilled job positions being filled by foreign students.

what's wrong with this picture?

 
At 3/05/2012 6:14 PM, Blogger Buddy R Pacifico said...

What major city does the Conference Board state has the lowest supply/demand ratio?

Hmm?

"Washington, DC continues to have the most favorable Supply/Demand rate (1.22) with about one advertised vacancy for every unemployed worker."

Hmmmmmm

 
At 3/05/2012 6:49 PM, Blogger Larry G said...

DC hires a TON of people as Contractors to the US GOVT - many are DOD, Homeland Security, etc.

Quantico and Fort Belvoir as well as about a dozen other DOD facilities ring Washington.

 
At 3/05/2012 11:31 PM, Blogger Hydra said...

The advertisements are on line, not the jobs.

True on line jobs are still hard to find. I had a nice gig for five years, but have not been able to replace it.

 
At 3/05/2012 11:31 PM, Blogger Hydra said...

The advertisements are on line, not the jobs.

True on line jobs are still hard to find. I had a nice gig for five years, but have not been able to replace it.

 

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