Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Convenient, Consumer-Driven Health Care on the Rise: Retail Clinic Use Jumps 10X in Two Years

Fierce Healthcare -- "With retail clinics increasing ten-fold, more health systems and hospitals are capitalizing on the trend and getting in on the retail movement. Between 2007 and 2009, retail medical clinics at pharmacies and other retail settings have risen from a monthly tally of 0.6 visits per 1,000 enrollees in January 2007, to 6.5 visits per 1,000 enrollees in December 2009, according to a new study by RAND Corporation, published in the American Journal of Managed Care (study abstract here).

Surprisingly, the availability of primary care physicians didn't affect use of retail clinics. The strongest predictor was proximity.

"It appears that those with a higher income place more value on their time, and will use clinics for convenience if they have a simple health issue such as a sore throat or earache," senior study author Dr. Ateev Mehrotra, investigator at RAND and the University of Pittsburgh, said in a RAND press release.

This week's announcement that Emory Healthcare, Georgia's largest hospital system is partnering with CVS MinuteClinic may demonstrate a broader trend of traditional hospital systems aligning with convenient clinics. Earlier this year, Mayo Clinic announced it moved into the Mall of America in what it calls the "Create Your Mayo Clinic Health Experience" center, a 2,500-square-foot space of high-tech interaction. And Walmart recently declared it wanted to be the nation's biggest primary care provider with its entrance into the retail care market."

MP: At the same time that the pending implementation of Obamacare threatens a government takeover of health care and medicine in America that will stifle competition and raise prices, the market continues to offer many new, innovative, alternative solutions to health care that are competitive, affordable and convenient.  The ten-fold increase in the use of retail health clinics in just two years demonstrates that consumers appreciate the market-based, consumer-driven convenience of affordable, no-wait service at retail health clinics, and they'll be pretty disappointed if that changes to long-wait, inconvenient health care under Obamacare.     

23 Comments:

At 11/23/2011 7:40 PM, Blogger Hydra said...

Let me know the first time you call an ambulance and have it take you to Walmart.

 
At 11/23/2011 8:24 PM, Blogger Che is dead said...

This comment has been removed by the author.

 
At 11/23/2011 8:27 PM, Blogger Che is dead said...

"Let me know the first time you call an ambulance and have it take you to Walmart." -- Hydra

From the post:

"It appears that those with a higher income place more value on their time, and will use clinics for convenience if they have a simple health issue such as a sore throat or earache," senior study author Dr. Ateev Mehrotra, investigator at RAND and the University of Pittsburgh, said in a RAND press release.

Only a moron, like you, would call an ambulance for simple health issue such as a sore throat or earache.

 
At 11/23/2011 8:52 PM, Blogger Hydra said...

Only a moron would equate such clinics with health care.

 
At 11/23/2011 8:56 PM, Blogger Hydra said...

Let me know the next time you have to call an am ulance and decide to save time and money going to the nearest clinic.

 
At 11/23/2011 9:24 PM, Blogger NormanB said...

The only way to make health care the most efficient is to have the users of it make decisions in their self financial interest. Unless another method is found then Health Care Savings accounts are the way to go. We no have enough data on these to formulate a structure.

 
At 11/23/2011 11:01 PM, Blogger Larry G said...

" Obamacare threatens a government takeover of health care and medicine in America that will stifle competition and raise prices, "

how come that didn't happen in Singapore when the govt took over health care?

 
At 11/24/2011 12:26 AM, Blogger Ron H. said...

Che: "Only a moron, like you, would call an ambulance for simple health issue such as a sore throat or earache."

But, why wouldn't he? It's FREE!

 
At 11/24/2011 12:10 PM, Blogger Hydra said...

Morons.

I damn near died of a sore throat once. Had a sudden infection that swelled up til I could not breathe, spent two days in intensive care.

It was not free. It was PAID FOR by insurance, you morons.

 
At 11/24/2011 12:16 PM, Blogger Hydra said...

Health care savings accounts are a fraudulent idea that the proponents know cannot work.

Poor people won't be a le to do it, most people wont do it, for the same reason they won't buy health insurance. And even well to do folks who do save will be wiped out by a catastrophic event.

Of course, you could have mandatory health savings accounts...........

 
At 11/24/2011 12:27 PM, Blogger Hydra said...

Ron:

Let me know the next time you walk to a Walmart clinic because you are too sick to drive.

Look, these clinics are fine. They fill a niche. They are not the answer to our health care problems.

 
At 11/24/2011 1:12 PM, Blogger Ron H. said...

"Poor people won't be a le to do it, most people wont do it, for the same reason they won't buy health insurance. And even well to do folks who do save will be wiped out by a catastrophic event."

Amazingly, you continue to suggest that someone else knows what is best for you, and that you should, therefore, be forced to do certain things whether you want to or not.

 
At 11/24/2011 1:45 PM, Blogger Ron H. said...

"Let me know the next time you walk to a Walmart clinic because you are too sick to drive."

Unlike you, I am able to determine what level of initial medical treatment my symptoms call for.

"Look, these clinics are fine. They fill a niche. They are not the answer to our health care problems."

No one has suggested that they are. Many people realize that they only need minor treatment, and don't need a doctor.

The explosive growth in the number of such clinics should tell you that many people consider them good alternatives to doctor's office and emergency room visits for minor problems.

People are voting with their dollars - something HSAs can help them do.

I know you struggle with the idea that people can, and do, manage their own lives, but it happens a lot when authoritarians like you get out of the way.

 
At 11/24/2011 5:15 PM, Blogger Hydra said...

Unlike you, I am able to determine what level of initial medical treatment my symptoms call for.

++++++++/+////////

You are either an idiot or lucky.

 
At 11/24/2011 7:51 PM, Blogger Hydra said...

All I can tell you is I was at work going a out my business, just a little scratchy throat, three hours later I was in the hospital struggling to breathe, and I was in my late twenties. Slam boom, for no apparent reason.

Likewise in my late fifties, a sudden infection in my knee caused a rush trip. Had been up and around on it all day, no symptoms, forty minutes later I was in agony knee swollen 2x, emergency surgery that Knight, walked out the next day.

So talk big while you can, if you are lucky you will never have those experiences, but don't draw generalities, because if it does happen, I doubt you will be headed to Walmart.

 
At 11/24/2011 7:55 PM, Blogger Hydra said...

When it takes six strong men to load you on a gurney, then tell me how much control you have over your life.

At that point all you want is help, and soon.

 
At 11/24/2011 8:14 PM, Blogger Hydra said...

You continue to suggest that someone else knows what is best for you,

+++++++++++++
You mean like the morons that suggest an HSA is best for me?

I am realistic enough to recognize what wont work, however much I might prefer otherwise.

 
At 11/25/2011 10:52 AM, Blogger juandos said...

"how come that didn't happen in Singapore when the govt took over health care?"...

Well larry g it seems a simple answer to me, the citizens of Singapore didn't and don't have a tradition of freedom we have in this country but are losing a little bit everyday...

Note the following from Paul Hsieh writing in The Objective Standard: "There is no “right” to health care. Rights are not entitlements to goods or services produced by others; rather, they are prerogatives to freedom of action, such as the right to free speech, the right to contract, or the right to use one’s property. Any attempt to enforce a so-called “right” to health care necessarily violates the actual rights of those who are forced to provide or pay for that care"...

 
At 11/25/2011 12:20 PM, Blogger Larry G said...

" Well larry g it seems a simple answer to me, the citizens of Singapore didn't and don't have a tradition of freedom we have in this country but are losing a little bit everyday."

what does that have to do with the fact that govt took over health care and it ended up less expensive and at the same time better outcomes such that it's among the best health care systems in the world.

Are you implying that you can't have good health care in countries with better "liberty" or "freedom"?

I note those opposed to Obama care are not making their case on "freedom"...

here's what Mr. Perry said:

" At the same time that the pending implementation of Obamacare threatens a government takeover of health care and medicine in America that will stifle competition and raise prices,"

well.. it turns out that Govt-controlled health care in Singapore actually spurs competition and Lowers prices.

so we know that govt-controlled health care can increase competition and lower prices, right?

but apparently we don't think an American version of it can work.

so we're doomed to the "best health care in the world", eh?

 
At 11/26/2011 4:58 AM, Blogger Ron H. said...

"All I can tell you is I was at work going a out my business, just a little scratchy throat, three hours later I was in the hospital struggling to breathe, and I was in my late twenties. Slam boom, for no apparent reason."

Based on many of the experiences you have had, and generously shared with us, you are the very definition of the word "outlier". Please don't use your own experiences as examples of anything.

"You mean like the morons that suggest an HSA is best for me?"

Nothing is best for you, so no one would suggest such a thing. But, for normal people, an HSA, along with a high deductible insurance policy may return some amount of control over medical spending to the actual recipient of the service, and many people who have them, are happy with them.

 
At 11/26/2011 4:19 PM, Blogger juandos said...

"what does that have to do with the fact that govt took over health care and it ended up less expensive and at the same time better outcomes such that it's among the best health care systems in the world"...

Well larry g I see two glaring problems here...

First is YOUR apparent inability to understand freedom and it cultural traits in a society that has it...

Second, where is the credible and substantial evidence that Singapore's health system is better than what's here in the US?

"...it turns out that Govt-controlled health care in Singapore actually spurs competition and Lowers prices"...

Again this backed up by nothing...

I've read the following: The Singapore Model and similer articles but I've yet to see one linked with any data to corroborate the claims being made...

BTW since the Singapore model apparently mandates a savings account how much pertentage wise would be enough per person to be saved?

larry g don't get me wrong but if something better were around sans government's heavy handed interference I'd be all for it...

 
At 11/26/2011 4:35 PM, Blogger Larry G said...

" Healthcare in Singapore is mainly under the responsibility of the Singapore Government's Ministry of Health. Singapore generally has an efficient and widespread system of healthcare. Singapore was ranked 6th in the World Health Organization's ranking of the world's health systems in the year 2000"

^ The World Health Report 2000 : Health Systems : Improving Performance

Singapore has "one of the most successful healthcare systems in the world, in terms of both efficiency in financing and the results achieved in community health outcomes," according to an analysis by global consulting firm Watson Wyatt

" Singapore’s health spending totaled US$2.8
billion (US$870 per capita) in 2000, equivalent
to 3 percent of GDP. In comparison, the global
average is 8 percent of GDP, with health spending
in OECD countries ranging from 5.8 percent
in the United Kingdom to 13.7 percent
(US$4,187 per capita) in the United States."

http://goo.gl/ePmqE

my point here is that ObamaCare and Singapore health care are BOTH govt-directed and the Singapore system is reputed to be among the best most cost-effective systems in the world.

I see no health care systems in the world that are not govt-directed that come close to govt-directed health-care in terms of costs and outcomes.

I keep asking for folks to name the best countries in the world for health care that are pure free market - not govt directed.. and the answer I often get is Singapore...which is not free market at all.. it's govt directed.

 
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