Saturday, April 16, 2011

Culinary Choice and Freedom: Keep Food Legal!

Keep Food Legal (KFL) is "the first and only nationwide membership organization devoted to culinary freedom," here are some of the organization's principles from its mission statement:

"We support the right of every American to grow, raise, produce, buy, sell, cook, and eat the foods of their own choosing. KFL’s mission is to promote goodwill, fellowship, and a sense of common purpose among those who grow, raise, cook, and sell food—and those who buy and eat it.

KFL will thrive and be a non-partisan force for culinary choice and freedom by coalescing the food community—food producers, farmers, food sellers, chefs, home cooks, diners, foodies, grocers, bar owners, and restaurateurs. 

KFL advocates abolishing all food-related government subsidies. Government subsidies distort prices and demand, cause environmental problems, and have played a large role in creating America’s obesity problem.

KFL will work to defeat food regulations and bans which limit our freedom to produce, cook, buy, and sell the foods we want. The government has no right to tell people what we can and can’t eat.

KFL will advocate at the federal, state, and local levels in favor of more food choices. It is not enough to oppose bad new laws. We will work—in legislatures and in the courts—to roll back bad ones already on the books."

Here's one example of the type of culinary freedom that KFL would probably support: the "underground night food raves" in San Francisco (pictured above), featured in the NY Times article "They Gather Secretly at Night, and Then They (Shhh!) Eat":

At this quasi-clandestine monthly event, a tribal gathering of young chefs, vendors and their iron-stomached followers are remaking the traditional farmers market as an indie food rave. In a sense it is civil disobedience on a paper plate

The underground market seeks to encourage food entrepreneurship by helping young vendors avoid roughly $1,000 a year in fees — including those for health permits and liability insurance — required by legitimate farmers markets. Here, where the food rave — call it a crave — was born, the market organizers sidestep city health inspections by operating as a private club, requiring that participants become “members” (free) and sign a disclaimer noting that food might not be prepared in a space that has been inspected.

Some see the growth of the underground markets as part of a high renaissance of awareness for a Fast Food Nation generation, with its antipathy for the industrial food machine. In the recesses of the markets, a certain self-expressive, do-it-yourself “craftness” flourishes.

Amateur cooks around the country are pushing to have the right to sell unlicensed goods directly to consumers. So-called “cottage food” laws that allow products considered nonhazardous, like pies and cookies, exist in 18 states, with five more considering similar legislation."

10 Comments:

At 4/16/2011 12:19 PM, Blogger juandos said...

"defeat food regulations and bans which limit our freedom"...

LMAO!

That little detail can be defeated at the polling booth come every election...

People tend to get the government they deserve...

 
At 4/16/2011 12:51 PM, Blogger Buddy R Pacifico said...

"People tend to get the government they deserve..."

and demand...

 
At 4/16/2011 5:34 PM, Blogger Benjamin said...

I take my hat off to Dr. Perry.

In the vast right-wing, amidst all the caterwauling, mau-mauing, braying, there are precious few words spoken about real economic freedom for people with little capital.

Jitney drivers, push-cart vendors, escorts, recreational drug dealers are entrepreneurs without money.

No think tanks are hired to estimate the "unintended consequences" of the vast panoply of local regulations that squish small people out of business.

Our right-wing "think tanks" too often resemble catamites for plutocrats, blowing on their rear-end mounted flugle horns for tax cuts on those who live richer than any rich people ever lived in history.

So here's a hand for Dr. Perry, who actually mentions the food-truck guys.

Now, how about push-cart sidewalk vendors and jitneys--have they no rights either?

 
At 4/16/2011 7:30 PM, Blogger Hydra said...

That little detail can be defeated at the polling booth come every election...

-------------------------------

You have way too much faith in the polling booth and the options provided at the polling booth, which are mainly tightly controlled.


Or, maybe people really do get the government they want.

 
At 4/16/2011 7:37 PM, Blogger Hydra said...

Jitney drivers, push-cart vendors, escorts, recreational drug dealers are entrepreneurs without money.

No think tanks are hired to estimate the "unintended consequences" of the vast panoply of local regulations that squish small people out of business.

===============================

Hear, hear! I know my local government is squishing me. I'm a lot more afraid of local government than federal government.

Or as one of my conservative friends said (on another topic)

".. another example of a phony baloney pseudo-conservatives implementing a change which expanded the size of government."

 
At 4/17/2011 12:04 PM, Blogger juandos said...

"You have way too much faith in the polling booth and the options provided at the polling booth, which are mainly tightly controlled"...

Well hydra you're wrong again...

I'm hoping that people will finally wake up (he says rather naively) and the The Myth of the Rational Voter will no longer be a myth...

 
At 4/17/2011 12:21 PM, Blogger frogger said...

Benjamin, you should check out the Institute for Justice. They defend small businesses against regulation.

 
At 4/18/2011 4:11 PM, Blogger Hydra said...

I'm hoping that people will finally wake up (he says rather naively)


===================================

I guess that is different from having too much faith in the polling booth or the change it might engender.

Hoping, waiting, and faith all kind of fall in the same bucket, I think.

 
At 4/18/2011 4:12 PM, Blogger Hydra said...

Benji:

I see New York is choosing a small delivery van fo its next taxi.

Can jitneys be far behind?

 
At 4/19/2011 3:15 PM, Blogger VangelV said...

Who do these people think they are? They want individuals to be treated with respect like adults. Who will be there to protect them from predators selling rotten food?

 

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