Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Want Less Corruption? Shrink Size of Government


Washington is riddled with both legal and illegal corruption because government is too big and has too much power. The federal budget redistributes $3.5 trillion through more than 1,800 subsidy programs. The regulatory burden is $1.2 trillion and there have been 51,000 new regulations since 1995. And there are more than 70,000 pages of tax law and regulations. These are the reasons why Washington is a hornet's nest of deal-making, influence-peddling, and back-scratching.

The Center for Freedom and Prosperity's new video, featuring Cato Institutes's Dan Mitchell, argues that reducing the size and scope of government is the only effective way to control Washington corruption.

Related:
The Ten Most Corrupt Politicians in U.S. History


5 Comments:

At 4/21/2009 9:43 AM, Blogger spencer said...

I have never seen a single example of one government bureaucrat bribing another government bureaucrat.

If only private sector actors are doing the bribing it would seem logical to eliminate the one doing the bribing.

This proposal does not meet the basic rules of comon sense.

 
At 4/21/2009 10:20 AM, Blogger 1 said...

"I have never seen a single example of one government bureaucrat bribing another government bureaucrat"...

Just means you haven't been paying close attention...

Its just not necessarily done with money... Its called backscratching...

RE: The Ten Most Corrupt Politicians in U.S. HistoryHardly worth the read if it doesn't include FDR...

 
At 4/21/2009 10:39 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

If only private sector actors are doing the bribing it would seem logical to eliminate the one doing the bribing.Get a clue. It's a protection racket. Either you contribute to their campaign or you don't get the contract. If you fail to pony up, they use the tax code to divest you of your earnings. You bring out the vote, they throw you a subsidy.

The ability to redistribute or threaten wealth draws the private sector in and forces them to pay.

 
At 4/21/2009 11:26 AM, Blogger jerng said...

ten worst = ten worst that got caught.

 
At 4/21/2009 4:29 PM, Blogger ExtremeHobo said...

Wern't all of the earmarks in the stimulus bill bribes for getting the bill passed?

Or if you want to get exact, how about this example from today's news.

On the day the new Congress convened this year, Sen. Dianne Feinstein introduced legislation to route $25 billion in taxpayer money to a government agency that had just awarded her husband's real estate firm a lucrative contract to sell foreclosed properties at compensation rates higher than the industry norms.The senator simply stole money from us and put it in her (spouse's) pockets.

Hmmm, I guess spencer would say it wasn't a bribe because they are husband and wife and love eachother.

 

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