Saturday, July 28, 2007

Salary Differentials, Why Not Tuition Differentials?

Salaries above are the median starting salaries by discipline for college professors at all public universities for the 2005-2006 academic year, according to CUPA-HR (College and University Professional Association for Human Resources). The data show significant salary differentials, ranging from $43,500 for theatre to $79,000 for business.

If universities across the country use salary differenatials for different disciplines as the standard practice when hiring professors, why should they object to "tuition differentials" when pricing different academic programs and majors? That is, why would universities object to charging higher tuition for business programs than for humanities? Well, many universities have started to use tuition differential pricing, but the practice is somewhat controversial.

Find out why in this NY Times article "Certain Degrees Now Cost More at Public Universities."

3 Comments:

At 7/28/2007 8:16 PM, Blogger Adam said...

While I like this idea from an accounting standpoint, it runs into problems, mainly because of college requirements themselves. For instance, the article mentions how students in other disciplines get to avoid the tuition increase when taking a general education business class, but would business students get a tution reimbursment if they were required to take a fine arts class? While not discussed, would this encourage colleges to start turning away from a liberal arts curriculum and go more into a conservatory or single subject system, reducing the general education requirements to keep students more in one discipline?

I can see many problems with this that would be an issue in practice. It was nice however to get the quote from Dean Kushner about an education not being so much of a public good anymore. Now if only others could see that and eliminate government funding and its resultant price increases on universities.

 
At 7/29/2007 9:32 PM, Blogger juandos said...

Hmmm, well this story is from the ever questionable New York Times ...

Those folks have a long & distinguished track record of lying to their readers...

For example: Walter Duranty

And this example: Robert Mugabe

So maybe some more investigation into what the Times has to say regarding tuition might just possibly be in order...

Just saying is all...

 
At 8/30/2007 12:09 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Wouldn't it follow that a woman would pay less tuition than a man?

 

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home