Thursday, January 05, 2012

Interactive Map of 2011 U.S. Migration Patterns

From Atlas Van Lines, based on 80,289 interstate and cross-border (Canada) household goods relocations from January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011.  

States that gained population with net inbound moves in 2011 include North Dakota (no surprise there), Texas, New Mexico, Alaska, Tennessee, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Washington, D.C., New Hampshire and Rhode Island. 

Other migration facts for 2011:

Michigan became a balanced state after six consecutive years of steady outbound moves. 

For the sixth year in a row, Washington, D.C. had the highest percentage of inbound moves. 

Ohio has the highest percentage of outbound moves.

9 Comments:

At 1/05/2012 11:19 AM, Blogger rjs said...

"Ohio has the highest percentage of outbound moves."

good riddance...

 
At 1/05/2012 12:06 PM, Blogger Benjamin said...

More folks moving into California than moving out
Mark Lacter • January 4 2012 3:12 PM
At least that's according to Allied Van Lines, which does an annual compilation of its moving van activity. But it was close: Allied handled 6,574 inbound moves in 2011, and 6,227 outbound moves. Perhaps more significant: California was the seventh most popular moving destination.

Linda Oakley, vice president of Atlas Transfer and Storage, told the Register: "We've had customers that we've moved out of state (CA) that have called us back to say, 'I want to come home,'"

I have live in other states, and they are hot, freezing, humid, and full of lousy restaurants and fat women. The scenery in Texas is pathetic,to nonexistent, and people there eat greasy tasteless "food."

In CA we have the worst government of any state (save perhaps TX), and still this is the best place to live---and now that we are generating jobs again, they are coming back.

 
At 1/05/2012 12:39 PM, Blogger KauaiMark said...

"...sixth year in a row, Washington, D.C. had the highest percentage of inbound moves"

A very disturbing trend in my opinion.

 
At 1/05/2012 3:17 PM, Blogger Bill said...

The list looks suspect to me given that they show Florida losing domestic population every year since 2004 yet the Census shows large population increases (17.6%) since 2000 and 2 new seats in the US House.

http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/12000.html

 
At 1/05/2012 5:38 PM, Blogger sethstorm said...

rjs:
Thank the current governor, John Kasich, and his boondoogles. He's done nothing beneficial for his pattern legislation, and wants to hide things behind private entities, like JobsOhio.

Also at fault is the Ohio government for not being more aggressive at making sure that businesses cant leave Ohio, or that other states cant sneak them out such as done with the state of Georgia.

Do that and one will go a long way towards saving Ohio.

 
At 1/06/2012 2:56 AM, Blogger Ron H. said...

"Also at fault is the Ohio government for not being more aggressive at making sure that businesses cant leave Ohio, or that other states cant sneak them out such as done with the state of Georgia."

The State of Georgia is sneaking businesses out of Ohio?

The mind boggles.

 
At 1/06/2012 4:44 PM, Blogger sethstorm said...


The State of Georgia is sneaking businesses out of Ohio?

By making $60 million offers that weren't known until they were finalized, in one case.

If anything, that makes a strong case for automatic immunity and protection from any criminal charge or corporate retaliation (including termination) for anyone who researches and/or discloses early and non-public information regarding any potential or certain future departure of any business to another state.

 
At 1/07/2012 4:51 PM, Blogger Ron H. said...

"If anything, that makes a strong case for automatic immunity and protection from any criminal charge or corporate retaliation (including termination) for anyone who researches and/or discloses early and non-public information regarding any potential or certain future departure of any business to another state."

What if someone signed a non-disclosure agreement as part of their employment contract - in other words, as a condition of employment?
Wouldn't violating such a contract be actionable, as is any other contract?

Any *potential* departure of any business to another state? That sounds pretty all inclusive. Wouldn't that result in such a tsunami of whistle blowing that no one would even pay any attention any more?

Do States have a right to keep businesses against their will?

You live in a strange world.

 
At 1/09/2012 4:52 AM, Blogger Les Johnson said...

I find it interesting that the peoples socialist paradise on your northern border has a nearly 70% move out ratio to the US.

Plus, its every province with the exception of Newfoundland.

 

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home