Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Exports from L.A. Port Surge in August

Loaded outbound export containers leaving Los Angeles for overseas destinations surged in August, registering an increase of 11.5% compared to July, and a gain of 24.8% compared to August of last year, according to shipping data recently released by the Port of Los Angeles (see chart above).  The 184,321 outbound containers set a new record for the month of August, and indicates that the global demand for U.S. manufactured products remains strong.  Strong August shipping from the L.A. Port should translate into solid August exports when the BEA releases international trade data next month, as well as contribute to gains in third quarter GDP when those data are released around November 1.     

In a related report, the Conference Board announced today that the Leading Economic Index for China increased by 0.60% in July, following increases of 0.90% in June and 0.40% in May.  The ongoing increases in China's Leading Economic Index signals that robust economic growth will continue in China through the rest of the year, although it's likely that growth in 2011 will slow slightly from 2010.  Continued economic expansion in countries like China will help to support demand for U.S. exports.  

5 Comments:

At 9/20/2011 10:25 PM, Blogger Benjamin said...

Learn to speak Mandarin. Or marry a Chinese girl.

Notice they are not choking the money supply in China--as they do in Japan.

The tale of two nations.

 
At 9/21/2011 8:47 PM, Blogger sethstorm said...


Continued economic expansion in countries like China will help to support demand for U.S. exports.

While at the expense of goods no longer being made specifically for US audiences/markets, to the detriment of a large US market.

 
At 9/23/2011 12:01 PM, Blogger Ron H. said...

"While at the expense of goods no longer being made specifically for US audiences/markets, to the detriment of a large US market."

There is no pleasing you. You cannot possibly be unhappy about both US imports and exports.

Don't you believe there is any way a US manufacturer could expand their business (this is a *good* thing, by the way), so as to continue satisfying a domestic market while also exporting more goods?

You are truly the most pathetic person who ever lived.

 
At 9/23/2011 4:00 PM, Blogger sethstorm said...


Don't you believe there is any way a US manufacturer could expand their business (this is a *good* thing, by the way), so as to continue satisfying a domestic market while also exporting more goods?

The problem is that the domestic market - the US in this case - receive products that are Third World targeted, with no substantial or specific targeting of US customers.

 
At 9/23/2011 6:15 PM, Blogger Ron H. said...

"The problem is that the domestic market - the US in this case - receive products that are Third World targeted, with no substantial or specific targeting of US customers."

Producers make what their customers want, as indicated by what they buy. Do you really think manufacturers would refuse to make things a vast US market wanted to buy because they wanted to restrict their production to items they can only sell in the third world? you really are clueless.

 

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home