Monday, January 03, 2011

Ph.D. Jobs: What's Hot (Econ), What's Not (History)

From today's Inside Higher Ed:

"During the 2009-10 academic year, the number of positions listed with the American Historical Association dropped by 29.4 percent, according to a study the group will release today. That follows a 23.8 percent drop the year before. Last year, the association announced that the number of listings it received -- 806 -- was the smallest in a decade; this year's total of 569 marks the smallest number in 25 years.

But in data also being released this week, the American Economic Association (AEA) is announcing that its job listings in 2010 recovered from a 21 percent decline in 2008. Further, the number of academic jobs exceeded the number in 2008. (Economics job listings include positions in the finance and consulting industries, in addition to academic slots.)

The total number of listings with the AEA rose to 2,842 in 2010, up from 2,285 in 2009, and only 43 jobs shy of the 2008 total. Because many of the 2008 openings that were listed were for searches that were subsequently called off, the AEA report -- prepared by John J. Siegfried, secretary-treasurer of the association -- says that it believes job openings are now above 2008 levels.

New academic jobs increased to 1,884 in 2010, up from 1,512 in 2009, and now exceed 2008 totals by 24. The vast majority of the academic jobs are at universities with graduate programs.  The top area of specialization in job listings, by far, was mathematical and quantitative methods, followed by microeconomics, macroeconomics and financial economics, international economics, and macroeconomics and monetary economics."

11 Comments:

At 1/03/2011 4:38 PM, Blogger juandos said...

Well I've met with forensic accoutants but I'm wondering if there is a forensic economics post grad programs around?

 
At 1/03/2011 8:41 PM, Blogger Hydra said...

Hard to get repeat clients in forensics.

 
At 1/04/2011 4:17 AM, Blogger GW South said...

Alternative Title -

"Jobs: What's Hot (Degrees that need Math), What's Not (Degrees that don't)

 
At 1/04/2011 9:49 AM, Blogger juandos said...

"Hard to get repeat clients in forensics"...

Why do you say that hydra?

 
At 1/04/2011 10:02 AM, Blogger morganovich said...

i know some forensic accountants that get very steady repeat work. you are assuming that the company that they are examining is their employer, which is rarely the case.

generally, it's an investor, banker, or lawyer that hires them.

think of the company they sift through as a "project" not an employer.

 
At 1/04/2011 10:37 AM, Blogger Buddy R Pacifico said...

Econ profession jobs subset that looks interesting:

Innovation Economics.

Note that a lot of these jobs are healthcare related where new economic ideas are urgently needed.

 
At 1/04/2011 12:08 PM, Blogger James said...

It is interesting that top jobs include “microeconomics, macroeconomics and financial economics, international economics, and macroeconomics and monetary economics.”

The disciplines that have most failed us are in high demand.

 
At 1/04/2011 12:44 PM, Blogger sethstorm said...


morganovich said...

Repeat temporary work is only temporary work. None of the security or reward, but all of the risk.

 
At 1/04/2011 1:05 PM, Blogger juandos said...

"None of the security or reward, but all of the risk"...

ROFLMAO!

Oh sethstorm I'm guessing you have no idea just how financially rewarding is for an established forensic accountant...

Here in the St. Louis, Mo area, hardly the hotbed of big time financial transactions one can easily pull down $300K per year early in one's career...

 
At 1/04/2011 2:33 PM, Blogger Walt G. said...

sethstorm,

How do you define non-temporary work?

 
At 1/04/2011 5:20 PM, Blogger sethstorm said...


How do you define non-temporary work?

Work that has no "fixed term" (or indirection), thus representing a longer term commitment versus temporary need.

Except for the rare cases and/or in very high skilled occupations(e.g. DoD contractors with hard-to-get clearances), it is used as a power grab.



Hard to get repeat clients in forensics.

Depends on who you consider your client.

 

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