Friday, December 10, 2010

Gender Differences on the SAT Test Explained



My video above was featured today on The American Enterprise Institute's American.com website, inspired of course by the "text-to-movie" technology from the Xtranormal.com website that was used to make "Quantitative Easing Explained" (3.5 million views now on "the YouTube").    

8 Comments:

At 12/10/2010 4:18 PM, Blogger Junkyard_hawg1985 said...

Mark, Great video! I enjoyed it.

There is also a homeschool video on socialization through the same format.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GjOXT_KSFhA

At the end after the one character had explained his position ad naseum, he finally said: "Matthew 5:22 limits any further response on my part."

Matthew 5:22:"...And anyone who says "You fool" will be in danger of the fire of hell."

I think Matthew 5:22 limited your character as well.

 
At 12/10/2010 4:33 PM, Blogger Rand said...

Why not calculate the difference between an individual's math SAT score and their verbal SAT score and to break these down by gender? For example, if X has a math score of 720 and a verbal score of 700, the differential would be +20. On the other hand a math score of 600 and a verbal score of 700 would have a differential of -100. High absolute values of the differential should be indicative of a talent difference for each individual. These could then be grouped and compared.

It would be interesting to see a chart of those differentials for males, for females, and overall.

 
At 12/10/2010 9:56 PM, Blogger W.E. Heasley said...

Hmmmm. Watched video. Then checked North Carolina School of Math and Science (supposed first such school for HS juniors and seniors and a model for others) student populations stats.

50/50 boys and girls this year (2010) and as far back as the eye can see.

Hmmmmm.

 
At 12/12/2010 7:56 AM, Blogger juandos said...

Thanks for posting this Professor Mark...

I'm making the assumption here that the historical results as shown in this cartoon are accurate, right?

 
At 12/13/2010 1:04 PM, Blogger Walenty Lisek said...

It’s disturbing we live in a time when speaking the truth about human biological diversity, which is as obvious as the sun in the sky, causes controversy and is fought so vigorously by supposedly educated and intelligent people.

Men and women are not equals, shock and horror. The Janet Hyde will not be amused.

 
At 12/15/2010 7:54 AM, Blogger smurphy8 said...

I think there is a difference between better at math and intrinsically better at math. I don't care what Mrs. Hyde was arguing. But I doubt there is much evidence either way about intrinsic differences in math ability between boys and girls. An SAT score sure isn't doing it for me. By that logic people in europe are intrinsically better at math than people in America.

I wonder what would happen if you took a group of asian girls and compared their math scores to that of American boys?

 
At 12/16/2010 11:37 AM, Blogger Kevin said...

"Hmmmm. Watched video. Then checked North Carolina School of Math and Science (supposed first such school for HS juniors and seniors and a model for others) student populations stats.

50/50 boys and girls this year (2010) and as far back as the eye can see."

I've a friend who attended, and it's actually a requirement of entry that an equal number of boys and girls are admitted. Additionally, because it's a state-run apparatus and politicians are involved in the process, there are also rules for the number of students that can come from various state voting districts. So some students get in easy, while others don't.

All this taken into account, I wouldn't use NCSSM enrollment to derive any statements about gender equality or even distributions of IQ across NC.

 
At 12/23/2010 5:34 PM, Blogger Vivek Gupta said...

I commend Perry for continuing to beat on the the politically incorrect boys' issue in education.

I am uneasy with the logical extensions of the 'boy do math better' argument because it would mean that boys are comparatively ill suited for the kind of service economy the world is heading toward, not to mention the much more contentious issues of racial gaps.

 

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