Wednesday, November 17, 2010

2 Milestones in Mexico's Futile Drug War: 10,000 Deaths This Year, and 1st Drug War Refugee Camp

1.The death toll from Mexico's drug war passed the 10,000 mark in early November, reaching 10,035 killed since the start of the year.  At that pace (1,000 per month), there will be around 12,000 deaths in 2010 from the War on Drugs (including so far this year 52 soldiers, 637 police officers, 276 minors, 326 decapitated victims, almost 800 victims who were tortured before being executed, etc.), which could more accurately be called "The War on Innocent Mexican People Because of Insane Drug Laws."  One thousand drug-related murders per month would be more than 33 killings every day, and more than one murder every hour of each day

The 12,000 drug-related murders in Mexico this year will bring the drug death toll in the last five years to about 30,000 (see chart above) as a result of drug laws in Mexico and the U.S.  In contrast, there have been "only" 4,561 combat-related American deaths in Afghanistan and Iraq combined since 2001.

2. As a Result of the War on Drugs, Mexico Has Its First Displaced-Persons Camp (source)

"When Hurricane Karl struck south-eastern Mexico in September, around 3,500 people left their homes to escape flooding. Last week, it was the north-east of the country that saw a displaced-persons camp sprout up. But the 400 people who are currently holed up in the event hall of the Lions Club, a charity group in the border city of Ciudad Miguel Alemán, were not relocated by act of God. Instead, they have fled from a man-made disaster: the fierce battle between the area’s two warring drug gangs, the Zetas and the Gulf “cartel,” for control of trafficking and dealing in the nearby town of Mier.

The drug gangs have plundered the well; burned the city’s police station, several businesses and dozens of vehicles; hung a dismembered corpse in a public park; and engaged in regular firefights.  Schools have closed, and even the local government has abandoned its offices in favour of safer quarters in Ciudad Miguel Alemán, 15km away. 

Many smaller municipalities along the border have also become virtual ghost towns this year. But the recent flare-up in Mier happened so quickly that some residents did not have time to arrange for a place to stay. In response, the town’s government-in-exile established a shelter at the Lions Club, and offered the room to those with nowhere to go."

MP: Can there be any rational, logical solution to stop this insanity other than the obvious one - legalization?

12 Comments:

At 11/17/2010 3:40 PM, Blogger Benjamin said...

Dr. Perry:

Are you crazy?

We need

1. The War of Poverty
2. The War on Drugs
3. The War of Terror

Such wars are, of course, unwinnable, so they are perfect to create coprolitic federal agencies that drain money out of the private jobs- and wealth-creating sector forever.

Hey, we have dumped $3 trillion on the War on Terror, and we are just getting started.

 
At 11/17/2010 4:45 PM, Blogger juandos said...

"MP: Can there be any rational, logical solution to stop this insanity other than the obvious one - legalization?"...

Why is there the assumption that 'legalization' will stop the insanity?

I mean the violence may well be mitigated by the legalization of certain or all drugs but for the cartels its not about the drugs, its about the money...

These cartels have already branched out to other lucrative venues for monetary gain...

Various parts of the American-Mexican border have had an on going kidnapping problem for several years now and there's no sign that it will let up...

 
At 11/17/2010 5:13 PM, Blogger Michael Hoff said...

I thought drugs were legal in Mexico already. No?

 
At 11/17/2010 6:04 PM, Blogger juandos said...

"I thought drugs were legal in Mexico already. No?"...

No sir!

Mexico's drug laws are far more harsh and draconian (like their immigration laws) than the comparable laws here in the US...

 
At 11/17/2010 7:24 PM, Blogger PeakTrader said...

"Can there be any rational, logical solution to stop this insanity other than the obvious one - legalization?"

Yes, an effective government, including law enforcement, to capture or kill criminals instead of surrendering to crime.

 
At 11/17/2010 9:21 PM, Blogger James Leroy Wilson said...

YOU can help end the Mexican Civil War: https://secure.downsizedc.org/etp/campaigns/109

 
At 11/18/2010 3:54 AM, Blogger PeakTrader said...

Did Prohibition Work?
Reflections on the End of the First Cocaine Experience in the United States, 1910-1945
RAND Corporation

"The use of cocaine began in the United States during the mid-1880s, reached a peak between 1900 and 1915, and then went into a sustained period of decline.

Cocaine remained at the margins of the American drug scene for over four decades.

Historical accounts have not attempted to explain why the once-popular drug disappeared.

Stricter laws regarding distribution eliminated the legal market, and made the cocaine that remained through illicit channels more expensive and harder to find."

My comment: If you tax (or regulate) something, you get less of it.

 
At 11/18/2010 9:25 AM, Blogger Tom said...

Which drugs do you want to legalize? Is it the heroine, the meth, the roofies?

How about having the US create a border that cannot be penetrated by tons of drugs each day? Our border, and non-expulsion of illegal aliens, is a joke.

 
At 11/18/2010 12:04 PM, Blogger QT said...

Have seen the comparison of MX deaths to American deaths in Iraq on a number of occasions. The implication being that somehow MX is more dangerous than an active combat zone. One wonders why such rhetoric goes unchallenged.

Firstly, the # of deaths in Iraq also includes the deaths of civilians and coalition forces. Secondly, the US fatalities in the Iraq engagement have been far lower than previous conflicts due to advances in body armour and emergency field treatment neither of which are available to hapless Mexicans. Thirdly, a comparison would also have to consider the relative size in population terms of both nations.

Crime stats are usually stated for comparison purposes in incidents per capita (ie. # per 100,000). Anything less is what one refers to as apples to oranges or rhetoric.

 
At 11/18/2010 4:49 PM, Blogger juandos said...

"The implication being that somehow MX is more dangerous than an active combat zone. One wonders why such rhetoric goes unchallenged"...

Hey QT did you check the Borderland Beat blog site link?

You might want to peruse that site and then give us your opinion...

I'd be most interested in it...

 
At 11/18/2010 7:38 PM, Blogger PeakTrader said...

"People don't kill people. Guns do."

"Organized crime groups may be involved in drug trafficking, arms trafficking, human trafficking, contract killing, piracy, counterfeiting, money laundering, extortion, illegal gambling, acts of terrorism, and political assassination."

So, let's legalize drugs, kidnapping, slavery, murder, theft, forgery, dog fighting, suicide bombers, etc.

 
At 11/20/2010 11:47 AM, Blogger Ron H. said...

"So, let's legalize drugs, kidnapping, slavery, murder, theft, forgery, dog fighting, suicide bombers, etc.

Interesting list. I can't help wondering what possible difference it would make whether suicide bombers are legal or not.

 

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home