Sunday, April 05, 2009

Compensation


Median CEO total compensation in 2008: $8.4 million (Source: NY Times).

Larry Summers' total compensation in 2008: $8.5 million (Source:
Washington Post), see some details above (via Infectious Greed), click to enlarge.

7 Comments:

At 4/05/2009 11:04 AM, Blogger stilettoheels said...

Is Larry's signature forged on the disclosure statement?

 
At 4/05/2009 12:25 PM, Blogger bobble said...

yes, obama promised "change".

installing larry summers in a position of influence is not "change". he was one of the early architects of the financial disaster we are now experiencing.

very disappointing.

 
At 4/05/2009 1:18 PM, Blogger OneCleverCookie said...

You do know that this is by design, don't you?

By Progressive standards, Summers is too much of a market proponent, and a "Sexist" to boot.

The Left Wing Nuts want Summers gone, and soon to follow is Volker.

Just be patient and observe.

 
At 4/06/2009 9:35 AM, Blogger 1 said...

Well for high paid losers Larry Summers is relatively cheap....

Consider the unjust deserts of a Franklin Raines...

It only gets better: Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac to shell out $ 210m as bonuses

 
At 4/06/2009 10:36 AM, Blogger OBloodyHell said...

> Consider the...

Nice. Thx. I've forwarded that to others.

I wonder if the media will jump on the GSEs the way they jumped on AIG?

Does Obama's "circle of greed" include the greed of government employees?

 
At 4/06/2009 1:59 PM, Blogger 1 said...

"Does Obama's "circle of greed" include the greed of government employees?"...

Not from what has been reported in the MSM as far as I can tell...

Yet there is something that I can only describe as reverse greed with extorted wealth from the citizens...

Stuart Varney of the Fox Business Network wrote the following in the WSJ: Here's a true story first reported by my Fox News colleague Andrew Napolitano (with the names and some details obscured to prevent retaliation). Under the Bush team a prominent and profitable bank, under threat of a damaging public audit, was forced to accept less than $1 billion of TARP money. The government insisted on buying a new class of preferred stock which gave it a tiny, minority position. The money flowed to the bank. Arguably, back then, the Bush administration was acting for purely economic reasons. It wanted to recapitalize the banks to halt a financial panic.

Fast forward to today, and that same bank is begging to give the money back. The chairman offers to write a check, now, with interest. He's been sitting on the cash for months and has felt the dead hand of government threatening to run his business and dictate pay scales. He sees the writing on the wall and he wants out. But the Obama team says no, since unlike the smaller banks that gave their TARP money back, this bank is far more prominent. The bank has also been threatened with "adverse" consequences if its chairman persists. That's politics talking, not economics.
...

So TARP is a real mess and the Obama administration is doing its best in making it messier...

 
At 4/09/2009 6:56 PM, Blogger Keith said...

I wish people wouldn't go along with the populist/socialist definition of "executive pay" as that earned by the highest-paid 0.1% of executive outliers. I'm sure the median executive salary is well down in the six figure range.

 

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