Thursday, March 05, 2009

Geography of the Recession

NY Times link. Job losses have been most severe in the areas that experienced a big boom in housing, those that depend on manufacturing and those that already had the highest unemployment rates. Related Article.

MP: Note the lighter shaded area that streches all the way from North Dakota (unemployment rate is 3.5%) and Wyoming (3.4%), all the way down through the middle of the country in states like Nebraska (4.0%), Oklahoma (4.9%), Kansas (5.2%), to Texas (6%), where unemployment rates are relatively low.

6 Comments:

At 3/05/2009 5:00 AM, Blogger PeakTrader said...

That's an amazing map!

 
At 3/05/2009 7:52 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

It would be cool if there was a way to overlay the traditional red/blue voting. It looks like the areas that went for Barry have substantially higher unemployment

 
At 3/05/2009 9:16 AM, Blogger save_the_rustbelt said...

Nice map, but not exactly news.

Last time I checked, North Dakota has about the same population as the Lansing Michigan area, so low unemployment there is hardly significant.

 
At 3/05/2009 12:15 PM, Blogger xcaverx said...

What I find interesting about this is the unemployment rate in northern Michigan. Apparently the rate is higher there than in southern Michigan, and yet the foreclosure rate (according to some newspaper articles within the past month or so) is quite a bit lower up there. I wonder why the disconnect?

 
At 3/05/2009 12:29 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

"Last time I checked, North Dakota has about the same population as the Lansing Michigan area, so low unemployment there is hardly significant."

Is the map based on % unmployment?

That belt in the middle is mostly agricultural and people there may be self employed or not show up in "non-farm employment figures".

Also a big pale spot in firecely independent New Hampshire.

And a big dark spot in heavily regulated CA.

Fascinating.

 
At 3/05/2009 12:36 PM, Anonymous jrich said...

Anon 7.52, you can go here and find a map of the election results by county and compare them if you like.

Rustbelt, what do raw numbers have to do with it when we're talking about unemployment as a percentage? By your logic, it would seem that NYC should have the highest unemployment, yet according to the map, it's among the lowest. And what about so much of Alaska, a sparsely populated state with high unemployment?

 

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