Tuesday, August 26, 2008

Mr. Mayor: How Do You Define "American-Made"?

My decision to strongly urge all Warren mayoral appointees to buy American-made vehicles was based on what I call "economic patriotism."

~Mayor Jim Fouts of Warren, MI, in today's Detroit Free Press


Dear Mr. Mayor:

What about these American-made vehicles produced by UAW workers in American factories for foreign car companies, do they count as "American-made" or not?

American-made UAW vehicles:
Mazda 6
Mitsubishi Eclipse
Mitsubishi Galant
Toyota Corolla
Isuzu i-Series Truck
Mazda B-series Truck
Mitsubishi Raider Truck
Toyota Tacoma Truck

What about these Canadian-made vehicles, produced by UAW brothers and sisters at factories in Canada, do they qualify as "American-Made"? Isn't Canada a foreign country?:

Canadian-made UAW vehicles:
Buick Lacrosse
Chevrolet Impala
Chrysler 300
Dodge Challenger
Dodge Charger
Ford Crown Victoria

Lincoln Town Car
Mercury Grand Marquis
Pontiac Grand Prix

Update: What about the Chevy Aveo, which is built by Korean automaker Daewoo?

Update: What about the 2008 Honda Pilot and Honda Civics, built in the U.S. with higher domestic content (70%) than the 2008 Dodge Ram (68%)?

9 Comments:

At 8/26/2008 3:24 PM, Blogger Conservative Scalawag said...

There is no such thing as an American made car any longer. My wifes car, a Ford Focus is made in Mexico, where my Nissan Altama is made in Tennessee. Neither by Union labor, hence why both were not as expensive as most and still run.

 
At 8/26/2008 4:04 PM, Anonymous bob wright said...

Ya know, some times you just have to laugh to keep from going crazy.

This mayor needs to see his doctor about having a "stupid-ectomy".

 
At 8/26/2008 5:07 PM, Blogger Marko said...

To me, economic patriotism means celebrating the fact that I can buy what I bloody well please.

Our government should have one purpose: keep them market free. Free, not fair, since your fair may be different from mine. Our free market is the same though (market sets the price based on supply and demand).

 
At 8/26/2008 5:40 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Here's a good *snip*:

Import automakers contend that their manufacturing efforts produce plenty of cars stateside, to the tune of billions of dollars in U.S. investment. Indeed, high-content U.S.-built vehicles from foreign nameplates include popular models like the Toyota Sienna (85 percent domestic content) and Tundra (80 percent). Meanwhile, hot sellers like the Ford Escape and Edge have seen their domestic content spiral downward: The Escape fell from 90 percent for '07 to 65 percent for '08, while the Edge dropped from 95 percent for '07 to 70 percent for '08.

From here:
http://www.cars.com/go/advice/Story.jsp?section=top&story=amMadeParts&subject=ami&referer=&aff=national

skh.pcola

 
At 8/26/2008 6:13 PM, Blogger OBloodyHell said...

> ~Mayor Jim Fouts of Warren, MI

C'mon, the guy's a two-bit political hack playing to the "Stuck on Stupid", which is a fairly large percentage of those still living in the industrial belt of Michigan.

 
At 8/26/2008 6:15 PM, Blogger OBloodyHell said...

> Meanwhile, hot sellers like the Ford...

Excluding, possibly, trucks, anyone who buys a Ford deserves to own a Ford.

 
At 8/26/2008 10:05 PM, Anonymous Fred said...

I had a Ford once. Operative word in that sentence being "once." The tailgate rusted through from the inside in two years. Never again.

 
At 8/27/2008 2:33 AM, Blogger juandos said...

Hmmm, Fords not what they once were...

I've had Fords, the last one being a '79 F-250 pick-up...

Great truck, ran it up through 300,000+ miles with only a water pump change out and a couple of u-joint change outs...

Even that Ford had parts from Mexico...

The large casted parts (bell housing, differential housing, and drive shaft) were from Monterrey Mexico...

Sadly it seemed that from 1980 and on Ford pick-ups seem to have all sorts of expensive little problems with them...

 
At 8/27/2008 10:08 AM, Blogger EmployerReport.com said...

Excellent and often overlooked points made on your post!

Great job!

 

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