Sunday, January 27, 2008

Health Care Rx: Market-Based Solutions

San Francisco Chronicle: With health care emerging as a chief domestic issue in the 2008 presidential race, the various candidates are pitching numerous platforms designed to reduce costs and broaden coverage. The proposals of all three Democratic candidates call for universal coverage, citing an estimated 47 million uninsured people in the United States.

Meanwhile, the private sector is quietly but consistently delivering an increasing number of market-based, affordable healthcare solutions, I have posted about many already. Here are a few more:

1. Early Solutions Clinics: "We see you now, we treat you well, we charge you less." Six clinics are now open in SE Michigan inside Meijer stores (similar to Super Wal-Mart). From its website:

Early Solutions Clinics are a no-appointment-needed health care clinic that offers basic services for a fraction of the cost and reduces patient waiting time. Our board-certified nurse practitioners will provide you with quick access to quality medical diagnosis and treatment under the direction of on-call physicians. In addition, all of our clinics are affiliated with hospitals nearby should you require advanced care.

Our clinics are open seven days a week, 364 days a year (closed on Christmas) in an effort to help you seek treatment at a time that is convenient for you. Hours: M - F 9 a.m. - 8 p.m., Sat 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. and Sun 12p.m. - 5 p.m. and most services cost $49.

2. Carol.com, a website that will allow people to “buy” on an à-la-carte basis the medical services they want done. From its website:

For the first time in the history of health care, everything you need to know to compare doctors, prices, locations, credentials and availability is in one place. In the Web-based marketplace, consumers can compare diagnostic imaging packages such as MRI and CT scans, annual physical, dental and eye exams and the costs of physician-recommended services such as mammography or physical rehabilitation.

From an article in today's Twin Cities Star Tribune:

Its creators want to do for health care what Travelocity did for airline tickets.
Carol's creators are riding the leading edge of a wave of change headed toward consumers just as questions about how to cure the nation's chronic health care crisis are resounding from the corner cafe to the presidential campaign trail.

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