Sunday, July 22, 2007

Recommended

1. Republican/libertarian Ron Paul, Texas Congressman and candidate for president, is featured in today's NY Times Magazine article "The Antiwar, Anti-Abortion, Anti-Drug-Enforcement-Administration, Anti-Medicare Candidacy of Dr. Ron Paul."

2. UC-Berkeley economist and now Chief Economist at Google (where he will build a team of economists, statisticians, and analysts to assist the company in “marketing, in human resources, in strategy, in policy related stuff”) Hal Varian is featured in an interview in the WSJ titled "Economics According to Google."

5 Comments:

At 7/22/2007 9:53 AM, Blogger Xevi said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

 
At 7/22/2007 4:16 PM, Blogger juandos said...

"Recommended"?

By you Professor Perry?

Well I don't know that Ron Paul who's publically exhibited and abysmal ignorance of Muslim attacks going back 200+ years on the US is a good choice in my humble estimation...

Ron Paul for me at least reenforced his inability to grasp world events past and present in the debate held at the Reagan Library ...

BTW anything and I mean even the most mundane thing coming from the New York Times is questionable at best... The New York Times does have a track record spanning decades of lying to its readers ...

My own experiences in the middle east in the seventies and eighties, especially Iraq led me to support Bush's attack of Iraq though the politically correct way of running that part of the war on terror was I think an abomnible mistake...

I'm guessing both Ron Paul and George Bush have never read Edward N. Luttwak's most excellent monograph, Give War A Chance

 
At 7/23/2007 1:13 AM, Anonymous Sudha Shenoy said...

Just a few facts. In 2000, there were over 1600 million Muslims -- a quarter of the world's population. They are found in countries stretching from Morocco & Algeria in North Africa, to Central Asia, South Asia & Indonesia. They speak dozens of different languages -- from Bahasa Indonesia, to Bengali,half-a-dozen Indian regional languages, several different varieties of Turkish, Pashto, Punjabi, Sindhi, Urdu, Baluchi, Persian, half-a-dozen varieties of colloquial Arabic -- many mutually unintelligible: a Moroccan cannot talk to an Egyptian or an Iraqi or a Sudanese; West African tribal dialects & languages. There are perhaps two dozen governments in the Muslim world.

_How_, how, did this ragtag & bobtail -- who can't even talk to each other in the same language -- run a homogenous conspiracy for two centuries...??!!

 
At 7/23/2007 7:37 PM, Blogger juandos said...

Sudha Shenoy has much to say about the diversity of people following the teachings of the pedophile prophet but left out one common denominator for all of them... The Koran...

Just how different is each varient of the Koran ?

 
At 7/24/2007 4:29 AM, Anonymous Sudha Shenoy said...

There are a number of different schools of interpretation of the Koran, that appeared at different times in Islamic history.

The 'strict' Wahhabis, for example, emerged in southern Arabia in the 18th century. They regard _other Muslims_ as 'apostates', who do _not_ follow 'pure' Islam. These reply by calling the Wahhabis 'backward, uneducated, Arab tribals'.

There are also a large number of Sufi schools, that are quietist & mystical. These are mainly found in Iran & India, & have often been persecuted by other Muslims, again as 'apostates' or deviants.

There are even some Muslims who really believe that 'jihadists' & other 'strict' Muslims actually betray the Koran. Some of these have been forced to flee to the West, but they continue to hold these beliefs. And they have their sympathisers & supporters in the Muslim countries they were forced to leave. And now there are even 'modern', feminist interpretations available.

It is common, especially in India & even in Iran, to find that the more educated Muslims are at odds with uneducated 'mullahs', precisely over exactly what the Koran says. 'Mullahs' denounce the educated as 'apostates'; the educated refer to the 'mullahs' as backward. And so on.

One-quarter of the world's population do not all think on identically the same lines. Especially when the varying levels of education & culture are considered.

 

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home